Survival in relation to hospital type after resection or sorafenib treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma in The Netherlands

Lydia G. M. van der Geest, Suzanne van Meer, Janina G. H. Schrier, Jan N. M. Ijzermans, Heinz-Josef Klümpen, Karel J. van Erpecum, Rob A. de Man

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background and objective: Despite an increase in recent years, hepatocellular carcinoma remains uncommon in the Netherlands. The aim of the current study is to explore potential effects of hospital type and volume on outcomes after resection or sorafenib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: Initial treatment and survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed in the period 2005-2011 were based on data of the Netherlands Cancer Registration. Potential risk factors (including hospital type and volume) for 30-days postoperative and long-term mortality in patients who underwent resection and in patients treated with sorafenib were evaluated by uni- and multivariate analyses. Results: In the period 2005-2011, 2402 patients were diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma: 12% received resection and 9% sorafenib. Postoperative mortality was higher in non-university hospitals (13% versus 4%; P= 0.01). Resection in non-university hospitals was associated with higher postoperative mortality (odds ratio 3.38, 95% confidence interval 1.37-10.68) and long-term mortality (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.40). Sorafenib treatment in non-university hospitals was also associated with higher long-term mortality (hazard ratio 1.39, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.82). Hospital volume was not independent predictor for outcome. Conclusion: In low incidence countries, outcome after resection or sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma may differ between various hospital types.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)725-735
JournalClinics and research in hepatology and gastroenterology
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

van der Geest, Lydia G. M. ; van Meer, Suzanne ; Schrier, Janina G. H. ; Ijzermans, Jan N. M. ; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef ; van Erpecum, Karel J. ; de Man, Rob A. / Survival in relation to hospital type after resection or sorafenib treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma in The Netherlands. In: Clinics and research in hepatology and gastroenterology. 2015 ; Vol. 39, No. 6. pp. 725-735.
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title = "Survival in relation to hospital type after resection or sorafenib treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma in The Netherlands",
abstract = "Background and objective: Despite an increase in recent years, hepatocellular carcinoma remains uncommon in the Netherlands. The aim of the current study is to explore potential effects of hospital type and volume on outcomes after resection or sorafenib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: Initial treatment and survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed in the period 2005-2011 were based on data of the Netherlands Cancer Registration. Potential risk factors (including hospital type and volume) for 30-days postoperative and long-term mortality in patients who underwent resection and in patients treated with sorafenib were evaluated by uni- and multivariate analyses. Results: In the period 2005-2011, 2402 patients were diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma: 12{\%} received resection and 9{\%} sorafenib. Postoperative mortality was higher in non-university hospitals (13{\%} versus 4{\%}; P= 0.01). Resection in non-university hospitals was associated with higher postoperative mortality (odds ratio 3.38, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.37-10.68) and long-term mortality (hazard ratio 1.21, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.04-1.40). Sorafenib treatment in non-university hospitals was also associated with higher long-term mortality (hazard ratio 1.39, 95{\%} confidence interval 1.06-1.82). Hospital volume was not independent predictor for outcome. Conclusion: In low incidence countries, outcome after resection or sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma may differ between various hospital types.",
author = "{van der Geest}, {Lydia G. M.} and {van Meer}, Suzanne and Schrier, {Janina G. H.} and Ijzermans, {Jan N. M.} and Heinz-Josef Kl{\"u}mpen and {van Erpecum}, {Karel J.} and {de Man}, {Rob A.}",
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Survival in relation to hospital type after resection or sorafenib treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma in The Netherlands. / van der Geest, Lydia G. M.; van Meer, Suzanne; Schrier, Janina G. H.; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; van Erpecum, Karel J.; de Man, Rob A.

In: Clinics and research in hepatology and gastroenterology, Vol. 39, No. 6, 2015, p. 725-735.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Survival in relation to hospital type after resection or sorafenib treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma in The Netherlands

AU - van der Geest, Lydia G. M.

AU - van Meer, Suzanne

AU - Schrier, Janina G. H.

AU - Ijzermans, Jan N. M.

AU - Klümpen, Heinz-Josef

AU - van Erpecum, Karel J.

AU - de Man, Rob A.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Background and objective: Despite an increase in recent years, hepatocellular carcinoma remains uncommon in the Netherlands. The aim of the current study is to explore potential effects of hospital type and volume on outcomes after resection or sorafenib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: Initial treatment and survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed in the period 2005-2011 were based on data of the Netherlands Cancer Registration. Potential risk factors (including hospital type and volume) for 30-days postoperative and long-term mortality in patients who underwent resection and in patients treated with sorafenib were evaluated by uni- and multivariate analyses. Results: In the period 2005-2011, 2402 patients were diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma: 12% received resection and 9% sorafenib. Postoperative mortality was higher in non-university hospitals (13% versus 4%; P= 0.01). Resection in non-university hospitals was associated with higher postoperative mortality (odds ratio 3.38, 95% confidence interval 1.37-10.68) and long-term mortality (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.40). Sorafenib treatment in non-university hospitals was also associated with higher long-term mortality (hazard ratio 1.39, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.82). Hospital volume was not independent predictor for outcome. Conclusion: In low incidence countries, outcome after resection or sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma may differ between various hospital types.

AB - Background and objective: Despite an increase in recent years, hepatocellular carcinoma remains uncommon in the Netherlands. The aim of the current study is to explore potential effects of hospital type and volume on outcomes after resection or sorafenib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: Initial treatment and survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed in the period 2005-2011 were based on data of the Netherlands Cancer Registration. Potential risk factors (including hospital type and volume) for 30-days postoperative and long-term mortality in patients who underwent resection and in patients treated with sorafenib were evaluated by uni- and multivariate analyses. Results: In the period 2005-2011, 2402 patients were diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma: 12% received resection and 9% sorafenib. Postoperative mortality was higher in non-university hospitals (13% versus 4%; P= 0.01). Resection in non-university hospitals was associated with higher postoperative mortality (odds ratio 3.38, 95% confidence interval 1.37-10.68) and long-term mortality (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.40). Sorafenib treatment in non-university hospitals was also associated with higher long-term mortality (hazard ratio 1.39, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.82). Hospital volume was not independent predictor for outcome. Conclusion: In low incidence countries, outcome after resection or sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma may differ between various hospital types.

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U2 - 10.1016/j.clinre.2015.02.004

DO - 10.1016/j.clinre.2015.02.004

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VL - 39

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EP - 735

JO - Clinics and research in hepatology and gastroenterology

JF - Clinics and research in hepatology and gastroenterology

SN - 2210-7401

IS - 6

ER -