Switching from branded to generic glatiramer acetate: 15-month GATE trial extension results

Krzysztof Selmaj, Frederik Barkhof, Anna N. Belova, Christian Wolf, Evelyn R.W. van den Tweel, Janine J.L. Oberyé, Roel Mulder, David F. Egging, Norbert P. Koper, Jeffrey A. Cohen, on behalf of the GATE study group

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Abstract

Background: Open-label 15-month follow-up of the double-blind, placebo-controlled Glatiramer Acetate clinical Trial to assess Equivalence with Copaxone® (GATE) trial. Objective: To evaluate efficacy, safety, and tolerability of prolonged generic glatiramer acetate (GTR) treatment and to evaluate efficacy, safety, and tolerability of switching from brand glatiramer acetate (GA) to GTR treatment. Methods: A total of 729 patients received GTR 20 mg/mL daily. Safety was assessed at months 12, 15, 18, 21, and 24 and Expanded Disability Status Scale and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans at months 12, 18, and 24. The presence of glatiramer anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) was tested at baseline and months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24. Results: The mean number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions in the GTR/GTR and GA/GTR groups was similar at months 12, 18, and 24. The change in other MRI parameters was also similar in the GTR/GTR and GA/GTR groups. The annualized relapse rate (ARR) did not differ between the GTR/GTR and GA/GTR groups, 0.21 and 0.24, respectively. The incidence, spectrum, and severity of reported adverse events did not differ between the GTR/GTR and GA/GTR groups. Glatiramer ADA titers were similar in the GTR/GTR and GA/GTR groups. Conclusion: Efficacy and safety of GTR is maintained over 2 years. Additionally, switching from GA to GTR is safe and well tolerated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1909-1917
Number of pages9
JournalMultiple Sclerosis
Volume23
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

Cite this

Selmaj, K., Barkhof, F., Belova, A. N., Wolf, C., van den Tweel, E. R. W., Oberyé, J. J. L., ... on behalf of the GATE study group (2017). Switching from branded to generic glatiramer acetate: 15-month GATE trial extension results. Multiple Sclerosis, 23(14), 1909-1917. https://doi.org/10.1177/1352458516688956