The association between birth weight and capillary recruitment is independent of blood pressure and insulin sensitivity: A study in prepubertal children

Richard G. IJzerman, Mirjam M. Van Weissenbruch, Jasper J. Voordouw, John S. Yudkin, Erik H. Serne, Henriette A. Delemarre-van de Waal, Coen D.A. Stehouwer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Alterations in microvascular function have been hypothesized as a possible mechanism explaining the negative association of weight at birth with blood pressure and insulin resistance in adult life. However, these variables are closely associated, so that it has been difficult to establish whether microvascular dysfunction is a cause or a consequence of increased blood pressure or insulin resistance. Design: Cohort study. Setting: VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Subjects: Twenty-one prepubertal healthy children showing a wide range in birth weight. Main outcome measures: Birth weight data were obtained from hospital records. Blood pressure was measured with an ambulatory 24-h blood pressure monitor, and insulin sensitivity was assessed with the hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp technique. Microvascular function (i.e. capillary recruitment during post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia and endothelium (in)dependent vasodilatation of the skin) was evaluated by videomicroscopy and iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. Results: Birth weight was positively and significantly associated with capillary recruitment [slope, 22%/kg birth weight; 95% confidence interval (Cl), 0.1-43; P<0.05]. Birth weight was not associated with insulin sensitivity and systolic blood pressure (slope, -0.11 mg/kg per min per pmol/l; 95% Cl, -2.4 to 2.2; P= 0.9; and slope, 1.4 mmHg; 95% Cl, -5.0 to 7.7/kg birth weight; P= 0.7, respectively). The association between low birth weight and impaired capillary recruitment was not affected by adjustment for blood pressure and insulin sensitivity. Birth weight was not associated with endothelium-(in)dependent vasodilatation. Conclusion: These results suggest that the association between birth weight and capillary recruitment is independent of blood pressure and insulin sensitivity. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that an impaired capillary recruitment plays a mechanistic role in the association of birth weight with blood pressure and insulin resistance in adult life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1957-1963
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume20
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2002

Cite this

@article{7065732fec0e4236b1520df5765066f5,
title = "The association between birth weight and capillary recruitment is independent of blood pressure and insulin sensitivity: A study in prepubertal children",
abstract = "Objective: Alterations in microvascular function have been hypothesized as a possible mechanism explaining the negative association of weight at birth with blood pressure and insulin resistance in adult life. However, these variables are closely associated, so that it has been difficult to establish whether microvascular dysfunction is a cause or a consequence of increased blood pressure or insulin resistance. Design: Cohort study. Setting: VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Subjects: Twenty-one prepubertal healthy children showing a wide range in birth weight. Main outcome measures: Birth weight data were obtained from hospital records. Blood pressure was measured with an ambulatory 24-h blood pressure monitor, and insulin sensitivity was assessed with the hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp technique. Microvascular function (i.e. capillary recruitment during post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia and endothelium (in)dependent vasodilatation of the skin) was evaluated by videomicroscopy and iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. Results: Birth weight was positively and significantly associated with capillary recruitment [slope, 22{\%}/kg birth weight; 95{\%} confidence interval (Cl), 0.1-43; P<0.05]. Birth weight was not associated with insulin sensitivity and systolic blood pressure (slope, -0.11 mg/kg per min per pmol/l; 95{\%} Cl, -2.4 to 2.2; P= 0.9; and slope, 1.4 mmHg; 95{\%} Cl, -5.0 to 7.7/kg birth weight; P= 0.7, respectively). The association between low birth weight and impaired capillary recruitment was not affected by adjustment for blood pressure and insulin sensitivity. Birth weight was not associated with endothelium-(in)dependent vasodilatation. Conclusion: These results suggest that the association between birth weight and capillary recruitment is independent of blood pressure and insulin sensitivity. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that an impaired capillary recruitment plays a mechanistic role in the association of birth weight with blood pressure and insulin resistance in adult life.",
keywords = "Acetylcholine, Blood flow, Blood pressure, Capillaries, Endothelial function",
author = "IJzerman, {Richard G.} and {Van Weissenbruch}, {Mirjam M.} and Voordouw, {Jasper J.} and Yudkin, {John S.} and Serne, {Erik H.} and {Delemarre-van de Waal}, {Henriette A.} and Stehouwer, {Coen D.A.}",
year = "2002",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00004872-200210000-00014",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "1957--1963",
journal = "Journal of Hypertension",
issn = "0263-6352",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "10",

}

The association between birth weight and capillary recruitment is independent of blood pressure and insulin sensitivity : A study in prepubertal children. / IJzerman, Richard G.; Van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M.; Voordouw, Jasper J.; Yudkin, John S.; Serne, Erik H.; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A.; Stehouwer, Coen D.A.

In: Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 20, No. 10, 01.10.2002, p. 1957-1963.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between birth weight and capillary recruitment is independent of blood pressure and insulin sensitivity

T2 - A study in prepubertal children

AU - IJzerman, Richard G.

AU - Van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M.

AU - Voordouw, Jasper J.

AU - Yudkin, John S.

AU - Serne, Erik H.

AU - Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A.

AU - Stehouwer, Coen D.A.

PY - 2002/10/1

Y1 - 2002/10/1

N2 - Objective: Alterations in microvascular function have been hypothesized as a possible mechanism explaining the negative association of weight at birth with blood pressure and insulin resistance in adult life. However, these variables are closely associated, so that it has been difficult to establish whether microvascular dysfunction is a cause or a consequence of increased blood pressure or insulin resistance. Design: Cohort study. Setting: VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Subjects: Twenty-one prepubertal healthy children showing a wide range in birth weight. Main outcome measures: Birth weight data were obtained from hospital records. Blood pressure was measured with an ambulatory 24-h blood pressure monitor, and insulin sensitivity was assessed with the hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp technique. Microvascular function (i.e. capillary recruitment during post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia and endothelium (in)dependent vasodilatation of the skin) was evaluated by videomicroscopy and iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. Results: Birth weight was positively and significantly associated with capillary recruitment [slope, 22%/kg birth weight; 95% confidence interval (Cl), 0.1-43; P<0.05]. Birth weight was not associated with insulin sensitivity and systolic blood pressure (slope, -0.11 mg/kg per min per pmol/l; 95% Cl, -2.4 to 2.2; P= 0.9; and slope, 1.4 mmHg; 95% Cl, -5.0 to 7.7/kg birth weight; P= 0.7, respectively). The association between low birth weight and impaired capillary recruitment was not affected by adjustment for blood pressure and insulin sensitivity. Birth weight was not associated with endothelium-(in)dependent vasodilatation. Conclusion: These results suggest that the association between birth weight and capillary recruitment is independent of blood pressure and insulin sensitivity. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that an impaired capillary recruitment plays a mechanistic role in the association of birth weight with blood pressure and insulin resistance in adult life.

AB - Objective: Alterations in microvascular function have been hypothesized as a possible mechanism explaining the negative association of weight at birth with blood pressure and insulin resistance in adult life. However, these variables are closely associated, so that it has been difficult to establish whether microvascular dysfunction is a cause or a consequence of increased blood pressure or insulin resistance. Design: Cohort study. Setting: VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Subjects: Twenty-one prepubertal healthy children showing a wide range in birth weight. Main outcome measures: Birth weight data were obtained from hospital records. Blood pressure was measured with an ambulatory 24-h blood pressure monitor, and insulin sensitivity was assessed with the hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp technique. Microvascular function (i.e. capillary recruitment during post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia and endothelium (in)dependent vasodilatation of the skin) was evaluated by videomicroscopy and iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. Results: Birth weight was positively and significantly associated with capillary recruitment [slope, 22%/kg birth weight; 95% confidence interval (Cl), 0.1-43; P<0.05]. Birth weight was not associated with insulin sensitivity and systolic blood pressure (slope, -0.11 mg/kg per min per pmol/l; 95% Cl, -2.4 to 2.2; P= 0.9; and slope, 1.4 mmHg; 95% Cl, -5.0 to 7.7/kg birth weight; P= 0.7, respectively). The association between low birth weight and impaired capillary recruitment was not affected by adjustment for blood pressure and insulin sensitivity. Birth weight was not associated with endothelium-(in)dependent vasodilatation. Conclusion: These results suggest that the association between birth weight and capillary recruitment is independent of blood pressure and insulin sensitivity. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that an impaired capillary recruitment plays a mechanistic role in the association of birth weight with blood pressure and insulin resistance in adult life.

KW - Acetylcholine

KW - Blood flow

KW - Blood pressure

KW - Capillaries

KW - Endothelial function

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036807508&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00004872-200210000-00014

DO - 10.1097/00004872-200210000-00014

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 1957

EP - 1963

JO - Journal of Hypertension

JF - Journal of Hypertension

SN - 0263-6352

IS - 10

ER -