The association of hearing impairment and chronic diseases with psychosocial health status in older age

S. E. Kramer*, T. S. Kapteyn, D. J. Kuik, D. J.H. Deeg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: This study examines the association of hearing impairment and chronic diseases (diabetes mellitus, lung disease, cardiac disease, stroke, cancer, peripheral artery disease, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis) with psychosocial status (depression, self-efficacy, mastery, loneliness, social network size) in older persons. Methods: The sample consists of 3,107 persons (55 to 85 years) participating in the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam. MANOVA, adjusted for covariates, was used to test the effect of hearing impairment on the combined outcomes. The association of hearing impairment and chronic diseases with psychosocial status was studied using multivariate regression analyses. Results: Hearing impaired elderly report significantly more depressive symptoms, lower self-efficacy and mastery, more feelings of loneliness, and a smaller social network than normally hearing peers. Whereas chronic diseases show significant associations with some outcomes, hearing impairment is significantly associated with all psychosocial variables. Discussion: The findings emphasize the negative effect of hearing impairment on quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-137
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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