The effectiveness of therapeutic shoes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Marloes Tenten-Diepenmaat, Marike van der Leeden, Thea P M Vliet Vlieland, Leo D Roorda, Joost Dekker

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The study summarizes the evidence on the effectiveness of therapeutic shoes on foot function, foot pain, physical functioning, health-related quality of life, adherence, adverse events and patient satisfaction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Studies investigating the effect of (ready- or custom-made) therapeutic shoes were included. For between-group designs, studies comparing therapeutic shoes versus non-therapeutic shoes were included. A literature search was conducted in The Cochrane Central Registry for Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, EMBASE and PEDro up to January 19, 2017. Quantitative data analysis was conducted; when this was not possible qualitative data analysis was performed. Eleven studies were identified. For custom-made shoes, no studies reporting between-group differences were available. Qualitative data-syntheses of the within-group differences resulted in weak evidence for the reduction of foot pain and improvement of physical functioning. For ready-made shoes, one study reported between-group differences, resulting in inconclusive evidence for improvement of foot function. Quantitative data-analyses of within-group differences resulted in a medium to large effect for the reduction of foot pain (SMD 0.60, 95% CI 0.28-0.92; P ≤ 0.001; 184 participants) and a small to medium effect for the improvement of physical functioning (SMD 0.30, 95% CI 0.04-0.56; P = 0.02; 150 participants). Qualitative data-synthesis of within-group differences resulted in weak evidence for improvement of foot function. Within-group results indicate that therapeutic shoes are likely to be effective in patients with RA. Definitive high-quality RCTs are necessary to investigate the between-group effectiveness of therapeutic shoes in patients with RA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)749-762
Number of pages14
JournalRheumatology International
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

Cite this

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title = "The effectiveness of therapeutic shoes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "The study summarizes the evidence on the effectiveness of therapeutic shoes on foot function, foot pain, physical functioning, health-related quality of life, adherence, adverse events and patient satisfaction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Studies investigating the effect of (ready- or custom-made) therapeutic shoes were included. For between-group designs, studies comparing therapeutic shoes versus non-therapeutic shoes were included. A literature search was conducted in The Cochrane Central Registry for Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, EMBASE and PEDro up to January 19, 2017. Quantitative data analysis was conducted; when this was not possible qualitative data analysis was performed. Eleven studies were identified. For custom-made shoes, no studies reporting between-group differences were available. Qualitative data-syntheses of the within-group differences resulted in weak evidence for the reduction of foot pain and improvement of physical functioning. For ready-made shoes, one study reported between-group differences, resulting in inconclusive evidence for improvement of foot function. Quantitative data-analyses of within-group differences resulted in a medium to large effect for the reduction of foot pain (SMD 0.60, 95{\%} CI 0.28-0.92; P ≤ 0.001; 184 participants) and a small to medium effect for the improvement of physical functioning (SMD 0.30, 95{\%} CI 0.04-0.56; P = 0.02; 150 participants). Qualitative data-synthesis of within-group differences resulted in weak evidence for improvement of foot function. Within-group results indicate that therapeutic shoes are likely to be effective in patients with RA. Definitive high-quality RCTs are necessary to investigate the between-group effectiveness of therapeutic shoes in patients with RA.",
keywords = "Arthritis, Rheumatoid/diagnosis, Chi-Square Distribution, Equipment Design, Evidence-Based Medicine, Foot/physiopathology, Foot Orthoses, Humans, Quality of Life, Recovery of Function, Shoes, Treatment Outcome",
author = "Marloes Tenten-Diepenmaat and {van der Leeden}, Marike and {Vliet Vlieland}, {Thea P M} and Roorda, {Leo D} and Joost Dekker",
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The effectiveness of therapeutic shoes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis : a systematic review and meta-analysis. / Tenten-Diepenmaat, Marloes; van der Leeden, Marike; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; Roorda, Leo D; Dekker, Joost.

In: Rheumatology International, Vol. 38, No. 5, 05.2018, p. 749-762.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Tenten-Diepenmaat, Marloes

AU - van der Leeden, Marike

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AU - Roorda, Leo D

AU - Dekker, Joost

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AB - The study summarizes the evidence on the effectiveness of therapeutic shoes on foot function, foot pain, physical functioning, health-related quality of life, adherence, adverse events and patient satisfaction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Studies investigating the effect of (ready- or custom-made) therapeutic shoes were included. For between-group designs, studies comparing therapeutic shoes versus non-therapeutic shoes were included. A literature search was conducted in The Cochrane Central Registry for Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, EMBASE and PEDro up to January 19, 2017. Quantitative data analysis was conducted; when this was not possible qualitative data analysis was performed. Eleven studies were identified. For custom-made shoes, no studies reporting between-group differences were available. Qualitative data-syntheses of the within-group differences resulted in weak evidence for the reduction of foot pain and improvement of physical functioning. For ready-made shoes, one study reported between-group differences, resulting in inconclusive evidence for improvement of foot function. Quantitative data-analyses of within-group differences resulted in a medium to large effect for the reduction of foot pain (SMD 0.60, 95% CI 0.28-0.92; P ≤ 0.001; 184 participants) and a small to medium effect for the improvement of physical functioning (SMD 0.30, 95% CI 0.04-0.56; P = 0.02; 150 participants). Qualitative data-synthesis of within-group differences resulted in weak evidence for improvement of foot function. Within-group results indicate that therapeutic shoes are likely to be effective in patients with RA. Definitive high-quality RCTs are necessary to investigate the between-group effectiveness of therapeutic shoes in patients with RA.

KW - Arthritis, Rheumatoid/diagnosis

KW - Chi-Square Distribution

KW - Equipment Design

KW - Evidence-Based Medicine

KW - Foot/physiopathology

KW - Foot Orthoses

KW - Humans

KW - Quality of Life

KW - Recovery of Function

KW - Shoes

KW - Treatment Outcome

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SP - 749

EP - 762

JO - Rheumatology International

JF - Rheumatology International

SN - 0172-8172

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ER -