The influence of preoperative psychological distress on pain and function after total knee arthroplasty A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS

J. C. Sorel, E. S. Veltman, A. Honig, R. W. Poolman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

We performed a meta-analysis investigating the association between preoperative psychological distress and postoperative pain and function after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Materials and Methods Pubmed/Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane library were searched for studies on the influence of preoperative psychological distress on postoperative pain and physical function after TKA. Two blinded reviewers screened for eligibility and assessed the risk of bias and the quality of evidence. We used random effects models to pool data for the meta-analysis. Results Six prospective cohort studies, with a total of 1525 patients, were included. The random effects models showed significantly poorer outcomes in patients who preoperatively had elevated scores on the pain catastrophizing scale, worse 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) mental health score, symptoms of anxiety and/or depression, and somatization dysfunction. After 12 months, the standard mean difference for pain was -0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) -1.04 to -0.44) and -0.56 (95% CI -0.80 to -0.32) for function. Conclusion Preoperative pain catastrophizing, mental distress, symptoms of anxiety and/or depression, and somatoform disorders appear to adversely affect pain and function after TKA. Some patients undergoing TKA may therefore need psychological support to improve the outcome and quality of life.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-14
JournalBone and Joint Journal
Volume101B
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Cite this

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title = "The influence of preoperative psychological distress on pain and function after total knee arthroplasty A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS",
abstract = "We performed a meta-analysis investigating the association between preoperative psychological distress and postoperative pain and function after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Materials and Methods Pubmed/Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane library were searched for studies on the influence of preoperative psychological distress on postoperative pain and physical function after TKA. Two blinded reviewers screened for eligibility and assessed the risk of bias and the quality of evidence. We used random effects models to pool data for the meta-analysis. Results Six prospective cohort studies, with a total of 1525 patients, were included. The random effects models showed significantly poorer outcomes in patients who preoperatively had elevated scores on the pain catastrophizing scale, worse 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) mental health score, symptoms of anxiety and/or depression, and somatization dysfunction. After 12 months, the standard mean difference for pain was -0.74 (95{\%} confidence interval (CI) -1.04 to -0.44) and -0.56 (95{\%} CI -0.80 to -0.32) for function. Conclusion Preoperative pain catastrophizing, mental distress, symptoms of anxiety and/or depression, and somatoform disorders appear to adversely affect pain and function after TKA. Some patients undergoing TKA may therefore need psychological support to improve the outcome and quality of life.",
author = "Sorel, {J. C.} and Veltman, {E. S.} and A. Honig and Poolman, {R. W.}",
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The influence of preoperative psychological distress on pain and function after total knee arthroplasty A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS. / Sorel, J. C.; Veltman, E. S.; Honig, A.; Poolman, R. W.

In: Bone and Joint Journal, Vol. 101B, No. 1, 2019, p. 7-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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