The Prevalence of Burnout Among Nursing Home Physicians: An International Perspective

Arif Nazir, Martin Smalbrugge, Andrea Moser, Jurgis Karuza, Charles Crecelius, Cees Hertogh, Sid Feldman, Paul R. Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Physician burnout is a critical factor influencing the quality of care delivered in various healthcare settings. Although the prevalence and consequences of burnout have been well documented for physicians in various jurisdictions, no studies to date have reported on burnout in the postacute and long-term care setting. In this exploratory study, we sought to quantify the prevalence of burnout among 3 cohorts of physicians, each practicing in nursing homes in the United States (US), Canada, or The Netherlands. International comparisons were solicited to highlight cultural and health system factors potentially impacting burnout levels. Using standard survey techniques, a total of 721 physicians were solicited to participate (Canada 393; US 110; The Netherlands 218). Physicians agreeing to participate were asked to complete the “Maslach Burnout Inventory” using the Survey Monkey platform. A total of 118 surveys were completed from The Netherlands, 59 from Canada, and 65 from the US for response rates of 54%, 15%, and 59%, respectively. While US physicians demonstrated more negative scores in the emotional exhaustion subscale compared with their counterparts in Canada and The Netherlands, there were no meaningful differences on the depersonalization and personal accomplishments subscales. Factors explaining these differences are explored as well as approaches to future research on physician burnout in postacute and long-term care.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)86-88
JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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