Three-Tesla MRI does not improve the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: A multicenter study

MAGNIMS Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: In the work-up of patients presenting with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), 3T MRI might offer a higher lesion detection than 1.5T, but it remains unclear whether this affects the fulfilment of the diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS).

METHODS: We recruited 66 patients with CIS within 6 months from symptom onset and 26 healthy controls in 6 MS centers. All participants underwent 1.5T and 3T brain and spinal cord MRI at baseline according to local optimized protocols and the MAGNIMS guidelines. Patients who had not converted to MS during follow-up received repeat brain MRI at 3-6 months and 12-15 months. The number of lesions per anatomical region was scored by 3 raters in consensus. Criteria for dissemination in space (DIS) and dissemination in time (DIT) were determined according to the 2017 revisions of the McDonald criteria.

RESULTS: Three-Tesla MRI detected 15% more T2 brain lesions compared to 1.5T (p < 0.001), which was driven by an increase in baseline detection of periventricular (12%, p = 0.015), (juxta)cortical (21%, p = 0.005), and deep white matter lesions (21%, p < 0.001). The detection rate of spinal cord lesions and gadolinium-enhancing lesions did not differ between field strengths. Three-Tesla MRI did not lead to a higher number of patients fulfilling the criteria for DIS or DIT, or subsequent diagnosis of MS, at any of the 3 time points.

CONCLUSION: Scanning at 3T does not influence the diagnosis of MS according to McDonald diagnostic criteria.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e249-e257
Number of pages9
JournalNeurology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Jul 2018

Cite this

@article{a9fc9bc697bf4d6482fa94d7bd357b45,
title = "Three-Tesla MRI does not improve the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: A multicenter study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: In the work-up of patients presenting with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), 3T MRI might offer a higher lesion detection than 1.5T, but it remains unclear whether this affects the fulfilment of the diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS).METHODS: We recruited 66 patients with CIS within 6 months from symptom onset and 26 healthy controls in 6 MS centers. All participants underwent 1.5T and 3T brain and spinal cord MRI at baseline according to local optimized protocols and the MAGNIMS guidelines. Patients who had not converted to MS during follow-up received repeat brain MRI at 3-6 months and 12-15 months. The number of lesions per anatomical region was scored by 3 raters in consensus. Criteria for dissemination in space (DIS) and dissemination in time (DIT) were determined according to the 2017 revisions of the McDonald criteria.RESULTS: Three-Tesla MRI detected 15{\%} more T2 brain lesions compared to 1.5T (p < 0.001), which was driven by an increase in baseline detection of periventricular (12{\%}, p = 0.015), (juxta)cortical (21{\%}, p = 0.005), and deep white matter lesions (21{\%}, p < 0.001). The detection rate of spinal cord lesions and gadolinium-enhancing lesions did not differ between field strengths. Three-Tesla MRI did not lead to a higher number of patients fulfilling the criteria for DIS or DIT, or subsequent diagnosis of MS, at any of the 3 time points.CONCLUSION: Scanning at 3T does not influence the diagnosis of MS according to McDonald diagnostic criteria.",
author = "Hagens, {Marloes H J} and Jessica Burggraaff and Kilsdonk, {Iris D} and {de Vos}, {Marlieke L} and Niamh Cawley and Emilia Sbardella and Michaela Andelova and Michael Amann and Lieb, {Johanna M} and Patrizia Pantano and Lissenberg-Witte, {Birgit I} and Joep Killestein and Celia Oreja-Guevara and Olga Ciccarelli and Claudio Gasperini and Carsten Lukas and Wattjes, {Mike P} and Frederik Barkhof and {MAGNIMS Study Group}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2018 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "17",
doi = "10.1212/WNL.0000000000005825",
language = "English",
pages = "e249--e257",
journal = "Neurology",
issn = "0028-3878",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",

}

Three-Tesla MRI does not improve the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis : A multicenter study. / MAGNIMS Study Group.

In: Neurology, 17.07.2018, p. e249-e257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Three-Tesla MRI does not improve the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

T2 - A multicenter study

AU - Hagens, Marloes H J

AU - Burggraaff, Jessica

AU - Kilsdonk, Iris D

AU - de Vos, Marlieke L

AU - Cawley, Niamh

AU - Sbardella, Emilia

AU - Andelova, Michaela

AU - Amann, Michael

AU - Lieb, Johanna M

AU - Pantano, Patrizia

AU - Lissenberg-Witte, Birgit I

AU - Killestein, Joep

AU - Oreja-Guevara, Celia

AU - Ciccarelli, Olga

AU - Gasperini, Claudio

AU - Lukas, Carsten

AU - Wattjes, Mike P

AU - Barkhof, Frederik

AU - MAGNIMS Study Group

N1 - Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

PY - 2018/7/17

Y1 - 2018/7/17

N2 - OBJECTIVE: In the work-up of patients presenting with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), 3T MRI might offer a higher lesion detection than 1.5T, but it remains unclear whether this affects the fulfilment of the diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS).METHODS: We recruited 66 patients with CIS within 6 months from symptom onset and 26 healthy controls in 6 MS centers. All participants underwent 1.5T and 3T brain and spinal cord MRI at baseline according to local optimized protocols and the MAGNIMS guidelines. Patients who had not converted to MS during follow-up received repeat brain MRI at 3-6 months and 12-15 months. The number of lesions per anatomical region was scored by 3 raters in consensus. Criteria for dissemination in space (DIS) and dissemination in time (DIT) were determined according to the 2017 revisions of the McDonald criteria.RESULTS: Three-Tesla MRI detected 15% more T2 brain lesions compared to 1.5T (p < 0.001), which was driven by an increase in baseline detection of periventricular (12%, p = 0.015), (juxta)cortical (21%, p = 0.005), and deep white matter lesions (21%, p < 0.001). The detection rate of spinal cord lesions and gadolinium-enhancing lesions did not differ between field strengths. Three-Tesla MRI did not lead to a higher number of patients fulfilling the criteria for DIS or DIT, or subsequent diagnosis of MS, at any of the 3 time points.CONCLUSION: Scanning at 3T does not influence the diagnosis of MS according to McDonald diagnostic criteria.

AB - OBJECTIVE: In the work-up of patients presenting with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), 3T MRI might offer a higher lesion detection than 1.5T, but it remains unclear whether this affects the fulfilment of the diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS).METHODS: We recruited 66 patients with CIS within 6 months from symptom onset and 26 healthy controls in 6 MS centers. All participants underwent 1.5T and 3T brain and spinal cord MRI at baseline according to local optimized protocols and the MAGNIMS guidelines. Patients who had not converted to MS during follow-up received repeat brain MRI at 3-6 months and 12-15 months. The number of lesions per anatomical region was scored by 3 raters in consensus. Criteria for dissemination in space (DIS) and dissemination in time (DIT) were determined according to the 2017 revisions of the McDonald criteria.RESULTS: Three-Tesla MRI detected 15% more T2 brain lesions compared to 1.5T (p < 0.001), which was driven by an increase in baseline detection of periventricular (12%, p = 0.015), (juxta)cortical (21%, p = 0.005), and deep white matter lesions (21%, p < 0.001). The detection rate of spinal cord lesions and gadolinium-enhancing lesions did not differ between field strengths. Three-Tesla MRI did not lead to a higher number of patients fulfilling the criteria for DIS or DIT, or subsequent diagnosis of MS, at any of the 3 time points.CONCLUSION: Scanning at 3T does not influence the diagnosis of MS according to McDonald diagnostic criteria.

U2 - 10.1212/WNL.0000000000005825

DO - 10.1212/WNL.0000000000005825

M3 - Article

SP - e249-e257

JO - Neurology

JF - Neurology

SN - 0028-3878

ER -