Victims of nature cry out

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Abstract

There is among the contributors to this book no consensus on the definition of nature. Some have argued that nature is everything that can be observed, distinguishing nature only from the supernatural world. Others have taken the view that nature is defined by life, in contrast to the inorganic world. Still others have set nature against culture. I will not take a position in this debate, but concentrate on the indisputable parts of all definitions of nature: Living nature, human nature and our genetic constitution in particular. Our DNA is a necessary condition for our mere existence, and is seen as an integral part of one's personality and self by many people. As a clinical geneticist I come across this aspect of nature in daily practice all the time.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIs Nature Ever Evil?: Religion, Science and Value
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages170-172
ISBN (Electronic)0203398173
ISBN (Print)0415290600
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameIs Nature Ever Evil?: Religion, Science and Value

Cite this

ten Kate, L. P. (2003). Victims of nature cry out. In Is Nature Ever Evil?: Religion, Science and Value (pp. 170-172). (Is Nature Ever Evil?: Religion, Science and Value). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203398173-28